LOVE’S PAIN: Startling revelation – 59% of Brits unaware that STIs can be contracted WITHOUT sexual intercourse

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In a surprising revelation, a recent report highlights that nearly two-thirds of the British population remain oblivious to the fact that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can be transmitted without engaging in sexual intercourse. Astonishingly, many individuals firmly believe that common infections such as chlamydia, herpes, and gonorrhoea can only be contracted through complete sexual intimacy.

A comprehensive nationwide survey conducted by the renowned Flo Health app targeting women aged 18 to 55 has exposed a disturbingly high level of misinformation and significant knowledge gaps concerning their own bodies.

Startlingly, over a quarter of the surveyed participants (26 percent) lacked awareness about the fact that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can be transmitted through oral, vaginal, or anal intercourse. Even more concerning, a staggering 59 percent were oblivious to the possibility of contracting an STI without engaging in any form of sexual activity whatsoever.

Furthermore, the study unveiled that one in 10 women erroneously believed that the “pull-out method” boasted an effectiveness rate of 90 percent or higher in preventing pregnancy. In reality, its effectiveness, based on typical use, is considerably lower at 78 percent.

Equally disconcerting, nine percent of the respondents held the mistaken belief that the frequency of sexual intercourse directly correlates with vaginal tightness, erroneously assuming that more sexual activity leads to a looser vagina.

These findings highlight the urgent need for comprehensive sexual education and enhanced awareness campaigns to dispel prevailing misconceptions, empower women with accurate information, and promote responsible sexual health practices.

In yet another concerning revelation, a significant portion of women (46 percent) were unable to accurately identify the optimal timing for sexual intercourse to increase their chances of conception. Additionally, a staggering 54 percent remained unaware of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) before experiencing their first menstrual period.

The renowned Flo Health app, attributing this lack of awareness to the impact of £1 billion cuts to NHS sexual health services since 2015, has pointed to the proliferation of false rumors online as a major contributing factor.

Worryingly, the study found that a substantial 56 percent of women in the UK rely on generic advice obtained from search engine queries, while one in 10 turn to social media platforms for information.

These findings shed light on the urgent need for improved access to comprehensive sexual health services and reliable resources. The detrimental consequences of funding cuts and the spread of misinformation underscore the necessity of robust education campaigns and enhanced support to ensure women have accurate information to make informed decisions regarding their reproductive health.

Experts have issued a warning about the potential risks associated with the widespread consumption of non-personalized and misleading information on TikTok, particularly within the realm of women’s health. Astonishingly, the #womenshealth content on the platform has accumulated a staggering 7.3 billion views, leaving users vulnerable to unreliable and potentially harmful information.

Dr. Claudia Pastides, MBBS, and Director of Medical Accuracy at Flo Health, emphasized the direct link between low health literacy and the propagation of misinformation. She highlighted the detrimental consequences that misinformation can have on health outcomes and the promotion of unhealthy behaviors, particularly in areas such as menstrual health, sexual health, and pregnancy.

The proliferation of misleading content on social media platforms like TikTok underscores the pressing need for increased medical accuracy, robust fact-checking mechanisms, and improved health literacy among users. Efforts must be directed towards equipping individuals with accurate, evidence-based information to empower them in making informed decisions about their health and well-being.

Flo Health acknowledges that every woman possesses a unique body and experiences distinct challenges and nuances in her menstrual and reproductive health. Unfortunately, this individuality is often overlooked or disregarded. However, Flo Health aims to be a part of the solution.

With a resolute commitment to empowering women, Flo Health strives to foster a deep understanding of their own bodies. By destigmatizing taboo topics and providing personalized access to medically credible health information, Flo Health endeavors to enhance women’s health literacy.

The ultimate goal is to equip women with the knowledge and tools necessary to navigate their unique health journeys with confidence and informed decision-making. Through personalized and tailored information, Flo Health seeks to empower women, celebrate their diversity, and contribute to the improvement of overall women’s health.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can be transmitted through various sexual activities, including:

  1. Vaginal intercourse: This refers to penile-vaginal penetration, where the infection can be transmitted through direct contact with infected genital fluids or lesions.
  2. Oral sex: Engaging in oral-genital contact can lead to the transmission of STIs if there is direct contact with infected genital fluids or sores.
  3. Anal intercourse: Anal penetration, whether it’s between partners of the opposite sex or same sex, can transmit STIs through contact with infected anal fluids or sores.
  4. Genital-to-genital contact: Skin-to-skin contact between the genitals can transmit certain STIs like herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV).
  5. Sharing sex toys: Sharing sex toys without proper cleaning or using a new barrier (such as condoms) for each partner can lead to the transmission of STIs.
  6. Mother-to-child transmission: Some STIs, such as syphilis, HIV, and herpes, can be transmitted from an infected mother to her baby during childbirth or through breastfeeding.

It’s important to note that some STIs can also be transmitted through non-sexual means, such as through contaminated needles (for example, in cases of intravenous drug use) or from mother to child during pregnancy. Proper use of barrier methods like condoms and dental dams, regular testing, and open communication with partners can help reduce the risk of STI transmission.

©russwatch.com




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